welcome to my website!

 

 

i am an american film music composer/musician living in

hamburg, germany.

 

 

i compose music for cinema and TV.

 

 

if you are interested in reading more,

hearing some of my music

or contacting me,

Edward Harris - Film & Music Composer

please click on the menu buttons above.

 

 

enjoy,

edward

I was born in 1959 in San Jose, California, just south of San Francisco. My father Jim was a postman and a baseball coach, my mother Stella, whose parents had come to the US from Italy, loved accordion and anti-pasti and looked after my brother, my two sisters and me.

 

One of my earliest memories is lying in the back of our family’s huge 1964 Chevrolet station wagon, with my ear next to the mono speaker listening to the AM radio playing The Beatles, Henry Mancini and Johnny Cash.
My father loved to listen to Elvis and Country and Western music. My mother liked anything with a good melody and lyrics she could understand, like, “Up Up and Away (in my beautiful balloon)”. Although I didn’t know it at the time, I learned a lot about the music they loved just by listening, listening, listening.

Traveling next to me in our car was my brother Ken, who was born two years before me. Ken and I shared our first passion: we loved to invent and build stuff, and were constantly taking things apart in order to understand how they worked.
We started building and modifying toys, games, tree houses, chopper-bikes, forts, and rafts, which we used to navigate San Thomas Creek near our house. On a fateful trip to the enormous San Jose Flea Market we discovered electronics. We bought old radios, record players, tape machines, speakers and parts. It is amazing that we didn’t get electrocuted fixing and modifying these things!

I was a bit too young to understand the 1968 “Summer Of Love”, but I distinctly remember hearing the psychedelic San Francisco sounds of bands like Jefferson Airplane, Santana and the Grateful Dead on the radio and emanating from garages where local bands practiced. This musical environment had its effect on my brother and me, and in 1972 we “got the bug” and both began playing guitar. We decided to form a band and needed a bass player. We bought a bass, formed a band called “Hunangsfall”, whose name we found in a Germanic mythology book, and started making music. That day I decided I would commit myself to learning both bass and guitar, which remain my primary instruments today. I also started to write and record original music for our band, first using our flea market recording machines, and gradually progressing to a four-track open reel machine. In Hunangsfall we played many different kinds of music—inspired by the concerts we were then attending in San Francisco by groups and artists as diverse as Genesis, John Cage, Led Zeppelin, Count Basie and The San Francisco Symphony.
This eclectic musical background served me well when I started writing music for film and television.

Mike Hall, my first brilliant private guitar and bass teacher, exposed me to the inner workings of harmony, melody and rhythm. I became aware of the fact that one could use these structural tools to create moods and stories; that was an epiphany! He also introduced me to diverse artists such as Stravinsky, Herbie Hancock and Bernard Hermann. It is also about that time that I realized that “real” specialized composers actually sat down and wrote those themes to Batman, The Pink Panther and Jaws.
Mike Hall encouraged me to study music, and when I informed my father of my intention to study; he said ‘You’re crazy!’ My mother told him it was a ‘phase’ that I would grow out of. They’re both still waiting for me to ‘grow up.’

Between 1977-1983 I studied Jazz and Classical music at West Valley College and San Jose State University, California. Although I learned a great deal about the mechanics and history of music there, my real education came from playing with great musicians in the booming multi-cultural music scene in San Francisco.

Around 1975 I played my first professional gig, a fashion show in a hotel.
I remember the shows director telling the band that they needed some “Egyptian” music while four men carried in a model lying on a velvet sofa!
The flute player in our band improvised in some sort of Hungarian minor scale and the rest of the band tried to sound Egyptian.

For the next dozen years I made my living freelancing on Bass and Guitar playing Jazz, in Orchestras, Theater music, Circus, Brazilian and Cuban music, Blues, R&B, Funk, Jewish bands, Country and Western, Pop, Rock, Italian polka bands. I played in the orchestra for Film/Theater star Richard Harris in “Camelot”, with the TV stars “The Smothers Brothers” comedy duo, and everything in between.

I also spent several years traveling literally around the world as a musician on cruise ships. The “Ethnic” music I heard on these trips played in China, Africa, Brazil and India widened my musical horizons. I realized that the “dialect” in music is so deep and culturally ingrained, that it was pointless to make a poor copy of it, but rather to attempt to understand its essence and borrow elements for use in my own music. Looking back, I realize that my experience with diverse world music proved to be very useful when for example, in 2008, I needed to write a Jewish theme for the film series “The Wolves of Berlin”.

Two weeks after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 I first came to work in Europe, on tour with a theater orchestra. We had two extended stays in the “Schauspielhaus” theater in Hamburg, Germany, a city I instantly loved. I spent the next four years dividing my time between California and Europe before I finally settled in Hamburg in 1994. I had fallen in love with a Hamburg girl and with the European way of life. I recognized that Germany’s long art and music traditions created an environment in which artists enjoyed a higher level of appreciation and respect than they did in the USA. I wanted to be a part of that.

When I moved to Hamburg my friend guitarist Dylan Vaughn organized an audition for a theater pit orchestra; I got the job. During my time in the theater I met American Jazz saxophone legend Herb Geller, with whom I worked closely for many years. In about 1996 Herb got me involved with the “Norddeutsche Rundfunk Big Band” (North German Radio Big Band), where I had the opportunity to play with many of my Jazz heroes such as Kenny Wheeler, Paquito de´Rivera, Albert Mangelsdorf, Abdulla Ibrahim, Slide Hampton and Michael Gibbs among others. I still play and record as a guest with the NDR today.

In 1999, I studied Composing for Film with English film composer Chris Evans, who was then Professor of Film Music at the Film Institute in Hamburg. Chris helped me grasp many technical aspects of composing and then synchronizing music and film on the computer, creating a musical “sound palette” to give a film an identity, and musical pacing as it relates to the plot.
I then studied in more depth the music of film composers, many of whom had fascinated me as a child. Investigating the music of Bernard Hermann, Nino Rota, Jerry Goldsmith, Enno Morriconni, John Williams, Howard Shore, Thomas Newmann, James Newton Howard, Mark Isham and Carter Burwell helped me to understand the secrets of their unique sound.

Chris Evans also introduced me to young director Florian Baxmeyer, for whom I wrote the music for his 2004 Oscar nominated film “Die Rote Jacke” (“The Red Jacket”). (See Filmography)
This opened several doors and helped me make the transition from player to film and TV composer.
I have had the opportunity to write in many different genres, and every film that I worked on has been an education. In animation films I learned how to create irony, in thrillers, how to build tension, in drama, how to musically depict the mental state of a character.

In film, I believe I have found the perfect platform to unify all my creative interests; writing and playing music in a wide variety of styles, designing and building, working with materials and textures, solving a puzzle, and collaborating with other creative people.

These are the things that I loved as a child. I look forward with enthusiasm to my next project when I will go into my studio to build something new—not with a hammer and pliers, like I did as a child—but with a pencil, collections of instruments and all my recording gear.

Ich wurde 1959 in San Jose, suedlich von San Francisco in Kalifornien geboren. Mein Vater Jim war Postbote und Baseballtrainer. Meine Mutter Stella war die Tochter italienischer Einwanderer. Sie mochte Akkordeons und Antipasti und kuemmerte sich liebevoll um meinen Bruder, meine beiden Schwestern und mich.

In einer meiner fruehsten Erinnerungen liege ich auf der Rueckbank unseres riesigen 64er Chevrolet Kombis, halte mein Ohr an den mono Lautsprecher und lausche Songs von Johnny Cash, den Beatles oder Henry Mancini, die damals auf AM Radio gespielt wurden. Meine Eltern hoerten beide viel Musik. Mein Vater liebte Elvis, Country- und Westernmusik. Meine Mutter mochte alles, was eine gute Melodie und verstehbare Texte hatte. Eines ihrer Lieblingslieder war “Up up and Away (in my beautiful balloon)”. Ich glaube, dass ich damals viel ueber die Musik meiner Eltern gelernt habe. Einfach, indem ich sie immer wieder gehoert habe.

Neben mir in unserem Auto sass mein zwei Jahre aelterer Bruder Ken. Ken und ich teilten eine gemeinsame Leidenschaft: Wir liebten es Dinge zu basteln, zu entwerfen und zu konstruieren. Wir nahmen staendig Sachen auseinander, um zu verstehen, wie sie funktionierten. Wir bauten Spielsachen, Spiele, Baumhaeuser, Chopper-Bikes, Forts und Boote, mit denen wir den San Thomas Creek hinunter fuhren. Eines schicksalhaften Tages machten wir einen Ausflug auf den riesigen Flohmarkt von San Jose und entdeckten dort die Elektronik. Wir kauften alte Radios, Plattenspieler, Bandmaschinen, Lautsprecher und Schrott. Alle diese Geraete bauten wir um, nahmen sie auseinander und modifizierten sie. Es ist ein Wunder, dass wir bei unseren Experimenten keinen Stromschlag bekamen.

Ich war etwas zu jung, um den “Summer Of Love” der 68er zu verstehen, aber ich erinnere mich deutlich an den psychedelischen San Francisco-Sound von Bands wie Jefferson Airplane, Santana und Grateful Dead. Er kam aus dem Radio und drang aus den Garagen, in denen die Bands der Nachbarschaft probten. Die boomende Musikszene infizierte auch meinen Bruder und mich. 1972 begannen wir beide Gitarre zu spielen. Bald darauf kauften wir uns einen Bass und gruendeten eine Band. Wir nannten uns “Hunangsfall” – einen Namen, den wir in einem Buch ueber Germanishe Mythologie gefunden hatten. Seit diesem Tag sind Bass und Gitarre meine beiden wichtigsten Instrumente.

Damals fing ich auch an, selbst Musik zu schreiben und aufzunehmen. Zuerst verwendete ich dazu unsere Aufnahmegeraete vom Flohmarkt, spaeter dann eine Vierspur-Bandmaschine. Als “Hunangsfall” spielten wir sehr unterschiedliche Stuecke, inspiriert durch Konzerte von Genesis, John Cage, Led Zeppelin, Count Basie und San Francisco Symphony, die wir damals in San Fransisco besuchten. Von diesem breiten musikalischen Background konnte ich profitieren, als ich anfing, Musik fuer Film und Fernsehen zu schreiben.

Mein brillanter Privatlehrer Mike Hall brachte mir bei, dass hinter Harmonie, Melodie und Rhythmus logische Strukturen stecken. Er fuehrte mich in die Musik von Stravinsky, Herbie Hancock und Bernard Hermann ein, und zeigte mir, wie man mit Hilfe struktureller Mustern Stimmungen erzeugen und Geschichten erzaehlen kann. Das war eine Erleuchtung! Damals wurde mir klar, dass es Menschen gibt, die ihre Zeit damit verbringen, Musik fuer Filme zu schreiben. Melodien wie die von Batman, Pink Panther und Jaws entstehen nicht durch Zauberhand, sondern werden von professionellen Komponisten erfunden. Diese Erkenntnis faszinierte mich. Mike Hall ermutigte mich Musik zu studieren, und mein Vater hielt mich fuer verrueckt, als ich ihm ankuendigte, dies tatsaechlich zu tun. Meine Mutter dachte wahrscheinlich, dass es nur eine Phase war, die ich irgendwann ueberwinden wuerde; sie wartet noch immer darauf.

Von 1977 bis 1983 studierte ich Jazz und klassische Musik am West Valley College und an der San Jose State University in Kalifornien. Obwohl ich dort eine Menge ueber Musiktheorie und Geschichte lernte, war meine eigentliche Schule das Musizieren mit grossartigen Kollegen.  

Um 1975 hatte ich meinen ersten professionellen Auftritt als Musiker. Ich spielte auf einer Modenschau in einem Hotel. Wir hatten die Anweisung “aegyptische Musik” zu spielen, waehrend vier Maenner ein Model auf einer Saenfte ueber die Buehne trugen. Der Floetist unserer Band improvisierte eine Melodie in ungarischem Moll, und der Rest der Band versuchte irgendwie “aegyptisch” zu klingen.  

Danach verdiente ich meinen Unterhalt lange Zeit als freischaffender Bassist und Gitarrist. Ich spielte Jazz, Orchestermusik, brasilianische und kubanische Musik, Circus, Blues, R&B, Funk, Country and Western, Pop, Rock, juedische Musik und italienische Polka. Ich spielte auch an Theatern, zum Beispiel fuer den legendaeren Schauspieler Richard Harris in “Camelot” und bei Auftritten des TV Comedy Duos “Smothers Brothers”.

Mehrere Jahre spielte ich auch auf Kreuzfahrtschiffen. So lernte ich die Musik unterschiedlicher Kulturen in ihren jeweiligen Laendern kennen. Die “ethnische” Musik aus China, Afrika, Brasilien und Indien erweiterte meinen musikalischen Horizont. Ich erkannte, wie tief der “Dialekt” dieser Musik mit der Kultur verwurzelt ist. Ihn zu kopieren schien mir sinnlos. Stattdessen versuchte ich die Musik in ihrer Essenz zu verstehen und in meine eigenen Kompositionen einzubauen. Im Nachhinein erweisen sich meine Erfahrungen mit diesen verschiedenen musikalischen Welten als sehr nuetzlich. 2008 musste ich beispielsweise ein juedisches Thema fuer die Filmreihe “die Woelfe” erfinden und konnte auf meine Erfahrungen zurueckgreifen.

Zwei Wochen nach dem Fall der Berliner Mauer 1989 kam ich zum ersten Mal nach Europa. Ich war mit einem Theaterorchester auf Tournee und hatte zwei verlaengerte Aufenthalte am Hamburger Schauspielhaus. Hamburg war eine Stadt, die ich sofort mochte. Die naechsten vier Jahre pendelte ich zwischen Kalifornien und Europa hin und her, bevor ich 1994 endgültig nach Hamburg zog. Ich hatte mich in eine Hamburgerin verliebt – und auch in den europaeischen “way of life”. Ich stellte fest, dass Kuenstler und Musiker in Europa einen hoeheren Stellenwert haben, als in den USA. Das hat meine Entscheidung nach Deutschland zu ziehen erleichtert.

Mein Freund Gitarrist Dylan Vaughn beschaffte mir eine Audition in einem Hamburger Theaterorchester, wo ich kurz darauf einen Job annahm. Zu dieser Zeit traf ich auch die amerikanische Jazz Saxophon-Legende Herb Geller, mit dem ich 6 Jahre lang zusammen spielte. In 1996 kam ich durch Herb in Kontakt mit der Big Band des Norddeutschen Rundfunks. Ich spielte dort mit einigen meiner Jazz-Helden wie Kenny Wheeler, Paquito de’Rivera, Albert Mangelsdorf, Abdulla Ibrahim, Slide Hampton und Michael Gibbs. Noch heute arbeite ich manchmal fuer den NDR.

1999 studierte ich Filmmusik bei dem britischen Filmkomponisten Chris Evans, der damals an der Hamburger Filmhochschule unterrichte. Chris zeigte mir, wie Musik und Film im Computer miteinander synchronisiert werden. Ich lernte, wie der Aufbau von Filmmusik den Aufbau des Plots beeinflussen kann und wie die Schaffung einer bestimmten Klangpalette dem Film eine musikalische Identitaet verleiht. Ich studierte Filmmusik aus einer neuen, analytischen Perspektive. Einige der Komponisten hatten mich schon von Kindheit an fasziniert. Leute wie Bernard Hermann, Nino Rota, Jerry Goldsmith, Enno Morriconni, John Williams, Howard Shore, Thomas Newmann, James Newton Howard, Mark Isham, Carter Burwell… Ich beschaeftigte mich mit dem Sound dieser Komponisten und versuchte hinter das Geheimnis ihrer Einzigartigkeit zu kommen.

Durch Chris Evans lernte ich den jungen Regisseur Florian Baxmeyer kennen und schrieb die Musik fuer seinen Kurzfilm “die rote Jacke”, der 2004 fuer einen Oscar in Hollywood nominiert war.
(siehe Filmography) Dieser Erfolg hat mir einige Tueren geoeffnet und mir geholfen, meinen beruflichen Schwerpunkt auf die Komposition von Filmmusik zu verlagern.
Ich hatte Gelegenheit, Musik fuer verschiedenste Genres zu schreiben.  Jeder Film, an dem ich gearbeitet habe, war fuer mich eine Schule. Beim Animationsfilm habe ich gelernt, wie man Ironie erzeugen kann, beim Thriller, wie man Spannung erzeugt, bei Drama, wie man den Gefuehlszustand eines Filmcharakters abbildet.

Beim Film habe ich das Gefuehl, dass ich meine unterschiedlichen Interessen besonders gut vereinigen kann: Ich schreibe und spiele Musik verschiedenster Stilrichtungen, ich entwerfe und konstruiere, ich arbeite mit Materialien und Texturen, ich setze Puzzle zusammen und tausche mich dabei immer wieder mit  anderen kreativen Menschen aus. All dies sind Dinge, die ich schon als Kind gerne getan habe. Es macht mir Spass, in meinem Studio etwas Neues entstehen zu lassen, und ich freue mich jedes Mal auf das naechste Projekt. Der einzige Unterschied zu frueher ist, dass ich heute nicht mehr mit Hammer und Zange arbeite, sondern mit meinem Stift, meiner Instrumentensammlung und meinem Studio.

Selected Filmography:

“Die Rote Jacke” / “The Red Jacket” Cinema
Director: Florian Baxmeyer
(OSCAR Nomination 2004)
Sehsuechte Producer’s Award 2002, Pro7 Newcomer Award 2002, Main Award Moscow 2002, Miller Tripods Australia Award 2002 for Best Cinematography, Golden Sparrow 2003 Gera, Golden Lion 2003 Taipei,Taiwan.
“Die Woelfe” / “The Wolves of Berlin” 3 – 90 Min. Episode TV mini-series (ZDF)
Director: Friedemann Fromm
Won “Adolf-Grimme-Preis 2010”
Won “International EMMY 2009”
Won “Goldene Nymphe Preis” in Monaco 2009
Nominated for “Deutscher Fernseh Preis 2009”
(German TV prize 2009)
“Hannas Entscheidung” Director: Friedemann Fromm
90 Min. TV Film (ARD)
“Moerderische Stille” Director: Friedemann Fromm
90 Min. TV Film (ZDF)
“Einstein File” Director: Friedemann Fromm
90 Min. Cinema Film
“Tatort” Niedersachsen – “Der letzte Patient”

Director: Friedemann Fromm
90 Min. TV Film (ARD)
“Tatort” Niedersachsen – “Es wird Trauer sein und Schmerz”

Director: Friedemann Fromm
90 Min. TV Film (ARD)
K3 Kripo Hamburg – “Ein Anderer Mann” Director: Marcus Wieler
90 Min. TV Film (ARD)
K3 Kripo Hamburg – “Gefangen” Director: Marcus Wieler
90 Min. TV Film (ARD)
K3 Kripo Hamburg -“Porzellan” Director: Friedemann Fromm
90 Min. TV Film (ARD)
“Moerderische Elite” Director: Florian Baxmeyer
90 Min. TV Film (Pro Sieben)
“Sperling und die Katze in der Falle” Director: Friedemann Fromm
90 Min. TV Film (ARD)
Doppelter Einsatz – “Nackte Angst” Director: Marcus Weiler
90 Min. TV Film (RTL)
“Pas de Deux” Director: Florian Baxmeyer
Cinema Short Film
“Benny X”
Director: Florian Baxmeyer
Cinema Short Film
Grossstadtrevier – “Grosser Bruder” Director: Lars Jessen
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Dirk und der Kammer des Schreckens” Director: Marcus Weiler
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Mit dem Rücken zur Wand” Director: Marcus Weiler
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Mit Pfand und Siegel” Director: Till Franzen
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Wunderbare Zukunft”
Director: Sören Senn
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Tote Liebe” Director: Florian Baxmeyer
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Fremde Maechte” Director: Florian Baxmeyer
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Nur Getraeumt” Director: Marcus Weiler
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Kalte Tage” Director: Marcus Weiler
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Kindersegen” Director: Marcus Weiler
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Rampensau” Director: Marcus Weiler
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Sheriff von Kranz” Director: Marcus Weiler
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Fette Beute” Director: Marcus Weiler
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Eine Sache des Vertrauens” Director: Marcus Weiler
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Gelegenheit macht die Liebe” Director: Marcus Weiler
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Eiskalt Erwischt” Director: Marcus Weiler
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Blackout”
Director: Marcus Weiler
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Rufmord”
Director: Jan Ruzicka
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Kaltes Kind”
Director: Felix Herzogenrath
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Katia’s Job”
Director: Felix Herzogenrath
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “St. Pauli vs. HSV”

Director: Felix Herzogenrath
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Alles für einen”
Director: Felix Herzogenrath
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
Grossstadtrevier – “Wer du wirklich bist”
Director: Lars Jessen
45 Min. TV Series (ARD)
BALKO – “Ausverkauf”
Director: Rolf Laccini
45 Min. TV Series  (RTL)
BALKO – “Eiskalter Plan”
Director: Rolf Laccini
45 Min. TV Series  (RTL)
“Der neue Vegetarier” Director: Michael Richter with co-composer Marcio Doctor
45 Min. TV Documentary-Film (ARTE)
“Der Preis der Bananen” Director: Michael Richter with co-composer Marcio Doctor
45 Min. TV Documentary-Film (ARTE)
“Die Schiefe Bahn”
Cinema (Animation Film)
Producer/Director: Katrin Albers/Jim Lacy “Stoptrick”
Awards:
Short film prize Schleswig-Holstein Filmfests 2008,
Audience Prize, Int. Kurzfilmfestival Hamburg 2008,
Audience Prize – “Shorts at Moonlight” 2008,
Praedikat besonders wertvoll FBW Filmbewertungsstelle 2008, Short film of the Month FBW Filmbewertungsstelle 2008,
Audience Prize Flensburger Kurzfilmtage 2008,
Audience Prize Exground Wiesbaden 2008
“Peter’s Prinzip”
Cinema (Animation Film)
Producer/Director: Katrin Albers/Jim Lacy “Stoptrick”
Awards:
German Industrial film Prize 2007,
Skoda-Short Film Prize International film fest Berlin 2007, Short Film Prize Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau Foundation 2008 Prädikat besonders wertvoll FBW Filmbewertungsstelle 2008, Short Film of the month FBW Filmbewertungsstelle 2008
“Whodunnit”
Cinema (Animation Film) In Production
Producer/Director: Katrin Albers/Jim Lacy “Stoptrick”
“Freenet”


TV Advert (Animation Film)
Producer/Director: Katrin Albers/Jim Lacy “Stoptrick”
“Reno Schuhe”
TV Advert (Animation Film)
Producer/Director: Katrin Albers/Jim Lacy “Stoptrick”
“Katzelmacher”
Theater Music for R.W. Fassbinder’s
Alte Wartesaal Theater Cologne, Germany

 

 

email:

info@edwardharris.de